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BulletSafe launched into the market in August 2013. Located in Troy, MI, a suburb of Detroit, MI, Tom Nardone, the company president has made sure the company has done a good job at sourcing quality materials and components in the manufacturing and assembly of his vests. Balancing quality with affordability the BulletSafe bulletproof vest – level IIIA is what you get.

BulletSafe Bulletproof Vest Review: Survival Body Armor?

BulletSafe Bulletproof Vest Review: Survival Body Armor?BulletSafe launched into the market in August 2013. Located in Troy, MI, a suburb of Detroit, MI, Tom Nardone, the company president has made sure the company has done a good job at sourcing quality materials and components in the manufacturing and assembly of his vests. Balancing quality with affordability the BulletSafe bulletproof vest – level IIIA is what you get. I wore the vest for over 50 hours, and tested it with bullets from various firearms. Let’s find out how it held up in this hands-on review of the BulletSafe Bulletproof vest! #1 BOB Bag #1 Body Armor The BulletSafe Bulletproof Vest Our Favorite Armor Can stop high-quality ammunition designed for deep penetration Comfortable to wear for long periods of time Buy Now (Only $299)! Quick Navigation BulletSafe Bulletproof Vest Review First Impressions Wearability A little fun and testing Pros and Cons of BulletSafe Bulletproof Vest Pros: Cons: Key Takeaways About the Author BulletSafe "Bulletproof Vest Review" Specifications: Manufacturer: BulletSafe Model Tested: BulletProof Vest IIIA Size Tested: Small Materials: Ballistic panels: Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Carrier: 600 Denier Polyester Sizes Available: XS- 4XL Height/Weight Range: Addition Information: Vests are manufactured in Shanghai with final inspection and assembly done in the US MSRP: $299.00 XS-2XL, $378.00 4XL Only available in black Has been tested up to .50 Desert Eagle First Impressions When I first removed the vest from the packaging, it felt slightly heavier than other IIIA vests I have used in the past. Based on my height and weight and referencing BulletSafe’s size chart, I received a small size vest. This vest weighed in at just over 5 pounds. With other similar IIIA vest weighing in at 3.5-4.5 pounds. However, those vests have a price tag starting at double the price point of the BulletSafe vest. Wearability The carrier impressed me with its overall quality, especially the details along the seams. With the vest being on the slightly heavier side, the additional width they offer with their shoulder straps helped in distributing the weight. While wearing the vest, I couldn’t tell the difference in weight. Nice wide shoulder straps distribute the weight well The carrier also has external pockets to add rifle plates should the need arise. I wore the Bulletsafe vest for a little over 50 hours during each workweek. While wearing the vest, I would compare it to other level IIIA vests in an external carrier. The reason being is vests specifically designed to be worn under your uniform shirt do not have the benefit and durability of a "600 Denier Polyester" shell. A little fun and testing Who doesn’t want to shoot a ballistic vest? I, for one, would love the opportunity to put the capabilities to the test. Below shows an image of how the ballistic panels performed with several calibers and rounds. BulletSafe shrugged off all the premium defense loads we used Finally had some favorable weather here in Alaska. It was a beautiful Sunday morning for some testing and range therapy. List of Calibers Used in Testing Federal 9mm 115 grain FMJ Hornady 9mm 124 grain XTP Fiocchi .357 Sig 124 grin FMJ Hornady .357 Sig Critical Duty 135 grain Buffalo Bore 10mm 220 grain hard cast I took all shots at seven meters, with three different calibers I had readily available. Top left is Federal 9mm 115 grain FMJ, the ones just to the right as you look at the picture are Hornady 9mm 124 grain XTP, is Fiocchi .357 Sig 124 grin FMJ, say what you want on Fiocchi ammunition, but when it comes to range ammunition in .357 Sig, I buy what’s in stock whenever I can find it, to the right is Hornady .357 "Sig Critical Duty" 135 grain, last but not least toward the bottom center is "Buffalo Bore 10mm" 220 grain hard cast lead rounds, one of my favorite calibers to shoot. The following pictures will show you the penetration int the actual vest. On the front side, you can see solid penetration into the vest material. However, you can see there was absolutely no rounds, or any compromise in the material protecting you. A slight disclaimer, the damage you see inside the red circle, missed the ballistic material allowing it to penetrate the vest completely. The vest held up exceptionally well for being shoot 18 times total. Having seen shoot vest before but not having had the opportunity to put the equipment to the test personally, I’ve always had a slight hesitation in believing it works. I can say now I’ve seen it stop not only several rounds, but it can stop high-quality ammunition designed for deep penetration. Pros and Cons of BulletSafe Bulletproof Vest Pros: Very affordable Wide range in sizes for all officer Withstands a wide range of rounds up to .50 AE Final assembly in America Generous return policy Wide straps distributes weight Cons: A little heavy Some snagging issues on duty shirt Sizing varies, remedy would be to try on it person If possible Key Takeaways You will be hard-pressed to find a ballistic vest with a IIIA rating for under $300. The attention to detail in BulletSafe’s production, assembly, and inspection rivals higher priced products. With vest fit and sizing in mind, use the size chart available on their website. I find the vest to be slightly on the larger size compared to other vests with standard U.S. sizing. I found my height and weight right in the middle of the small vest’s range. I would size down if ordering another one, due to the overall length and width at the chest and shoulders. The vest wore well under a loose-fitting uniform shirt. It is by far more comfortable when worn as an external vest. BulletSafe has a generous return and exchange policy, considering this is a wearable product. There are a couple of things I would have changed while designing the vest. On the waist adjustable straps, I would switch the hook and loop. Being that the hook is on the vest portion of tends to snag on a uniform shirt when wearing the vest concealed. I would also increase the size of the hook and loop on the carrier along the belly portion to allow for farther adjustment. BulletSafe as designed and made a quality product to reach individuals who have to procure vests on their own or for smaller companies who cannot afford to order their employees custom fitted vest with a price tag starting at $1000. #1 BOB Bag #1 Body Armor The BulletSafe Bulletproof Vest "Our Favorite Armor" Can stop high-quality ammunition designed for deep penetration Comfortable to wear for long periods of time Buy Now (Only $299)! About the Author Mathew Umstead is a U.S. Marine Corps Veteran with 4 years active service as Military Police where he spent most of his time on a Special Reaction Team becoming proficient in special tactics and response. After his time with the Marine Corps, in 2007 he transitioned into law enforcement where he spent 8 years as a federal police officer. He now spends his days in Alaska as a lead firearms instructor teaching federal police officers, contractors, and military personnel on basic marksmanship and weapons tactics for various firearms ranging from 9mm pistol up to the .50 caliber machine gun. When not at work, he enjoys hunting, fishing, camping, and hiking with his family. Other interesting articles: Leatherback Gear TACTICAL ONE Bulletproof Backpack Review Survival Gear Review: MSR Dromedary Bladder Review SIG SAUER MPX-C 9mm Review: Survival Gun Review for 2020 "Survival Gear Review" : Valkyrie War Cord Survival Frag

Top 10 Common Prepper Fails

Top 10 Common Prepper Fails

Being successful at prepping is a lot more difficult than most people think. In fact, the failure rate for fully prepared survivalists is pretty high on a deployment level. This is nothing to be ashamed about, because nobody ever said that life itself was going to be easy. Prepping effectively just adds extra stresses and budgetary restraints to everyday life survival.  For sure there is nothing new about that. However, if you elect to strike upon the path to preparing for disasters and SHTFs at any level, there are some tasks that must be accomplished to be reasonably ready for any threat.  As you begin the process, here are ten areas of concern that could very easily bog you down.  You need to know these up front to fully accept the challenge of prepping. Quick Navigation 1. Failure to Prep 2. Fail to Plan 3. Fail to Supply 4. Fail to Gear Up 5. Failure to Become Weaponized 6. Failure to Assess Threats 7. Failure to Train 8. Fail to Map a Bug Out 9. Failing to Practice 10. Failure to Secure a Bug In 1. Failure to Prep Remember Harvey , Irma, and Nate?  Nice sounding group, like people you might have over for a backyard BBQ. Except these were hurricanes that disrupted the lives of tens of thousands of residents.  Remember the clogged highways of escapees, and what happened to those unwilling to evacuate?  Some of them are dead.  Why?  Because they were ill prepared to weather a storm or have sense enough to heed the advice to leave the area. You cannot reasonably expect to withstand a storm or any SHTF unless you have prepared to do so.  That means a commitment to prepping at a most basic level.  If you sit on the fence forever, you are likely to die there.  So, if you never elect to begin the process, you are a failure to start with.  But, of course, that can be easily reversed by stepping up to the plate. 2. Fail to Plan Ok, you bit the bullet, but not all the way through.  In your mind, you wanted to start a prepping process for you and your family, but so far, nothing has happened.  Like a diet or exercise (tell me about it) following through can be the tough part just to jump off center. Prep planning is really quite simple and indeed can be a fun and challenging trial.  First, buy a basic how-to book.  Pick a basic one that would seem to cover all the basic bases.  It might take a couple volumes or more.  These works will get you to thinking about all the steps involved in prepping for a bug in or out, or other SHTF scenarios. Naturally continue to read the article posts here at SurvivalCache.com and our sister site at SHTFBlog.com . There is a wealth of common sense advice here at both the elementary and advanced levels.  Check out the sidebars, too for supplies and gear to purchase at Forge Survival Supply. Start a prepping notebook.  Build sections or folders containing ideas, plans, do-lists, gear needs, supply needs, and everything else.  This notebook should become your prepper’s owner’s manual.  Prepping is a lifelong process, so kick start that baby now. 3. Fail to Supply Many wannabe preppers I have advised simply fail to initiate the process by stocking up on all the essentials they will need to survive a SHTF.  Be it a hurricane, flood, wildfire, tornado, civil unrest, or economic collapse, it is going to take supplies of every description to withstand the downfall.  This may be for 72 hours or 72 days or more.  Who knows? Again, build your needs lists and little by little as you can afford it, start to create a survival cache of supplies to hold you over.  Go for water, food, medical, and security core supplies.  Collect them, rotate them by use, and be ready. Also Read: 8 Mistakes of Wilderness Survival 4. Fail to Gear Up Just as with the life supplies mentioned above, there will be a number of vital hardware items needed too.  This might be a chainsaw to remove downed trees or limbs after a storm in order to get down the driveway.  It might be gardening tools and supplies to plant your own food producing garden.  It could be installing and maintaining a hand pump water well in the backyard.  It could be something as simple as a couple fire extinguishers in the house or shop. You may need all kinds of mechanical tools to fix stuff.  This includes typical mechanics tools from screwdrivers to wrenches.  You may need carpentry tools to build things or repair stuff around the homestead.  You may need at least one gas powered electric generator to run drills or saws. Gearing up can be a slow process and an expensive one.  All your tool acquisitions do not have to be new ones.  Think about garage and yard sales, pawn shops, and other ways to pick up some items without having to pay retail prices.  Take small bites on this one, but keep eating away at the lists. 5. Failure to Become Weaponized Shocking to some but not others, the idea of buying guns, having guns, and using guns is not particularly comfortable, especially if you were not raised up around them.  For others, they often make the mistake of too much emphasis on guns and ammo to the neglect of other critical aspects of prepper survival. Push comes to shove you cannot eat a gun.  Unless you intend to turn rogue and take supplies from others, survival weapons are primarily intended for defense measures.  You want to be able to protect yourself and your family from external threats to your life.  This requires more than a Bible and a pitch fork.  It takes a gun. Related: Top 10 Skills for the Advanced Prepper Do some reading, ask around, visit some gun shops or gun shows, and shooting ranges.  Do a lot of research and don’t get talked into anything.  To start all you will need is a basic handgun, revolver or pistol, a good 12-gauge (or 20) shotgun, and a defensive rifle.  The later can be the last to acquire if funding is tight.  There are entire books on this subject so buy one, even my own, Basic Prepping Essentials-Weapons to start out. 6. Failure to Assess Threats This is a public awareness aspect and the initiative to stay tuned into the world around you.  This includes across the street, in the neighborhood and town where you live as well as the state.  It also means our country and the world.  Include in this regular daily monitoring of the local, regional, and national news and weather.  Know what is happening around you and you are more likely to be ready for anything. 7. Failure to Train This not only or just includes the security aspects of self-protection, but learning to do all the tasks required to survive.  For sure learn to handle, shoot and maintain your stash of firearms, but how to hunt and clean wild game.  Know how to start a fire under all kinds of circumstances.  Learn to cook over an open campfire and to set up an emergency camp. Most of us preppers fall very short in this area.  We have a lot of stuff, but can we use it all and under the stress of an emergency?  You better know.  Sign up for training programs in all sorts of areas like carpentry, auto mechanics, small engine repair, plumbing, sewing, gardening, hiking, camping, shooting, and much more.  Don’t forget first aid and medical skills training, too. 8. Fail to Map a Bug Out If a hurricane is 48 hours out from your location, do you have the faintest idea where to go?  Do you know the many viable escape routes and have you traveled them just to inspect the availability of services, and supplies along the way?  Have you identified the gas stations, hospitals, police stations, grocery stores, camping areas or hotels?  You best know, and have alternatives mapped out as well.  Then take weekend trial runs to check them out.  Are your Bug Out bags packed and ready to go at a minute’s notice? Related: Top 10 Guns for Survival 9. Failing to Practice Practice is different from training.  First you learn how to do something correctly, then you put it into use by continuing to practice the skills on a regular basis.  If you took a golfing lesson then never played golf again, what good did it do?  The same with any other skill you acquire from shooting to running a table saw, or operating a welding machine. 10. Failure to Secure a Bug In While a lot of preppers gear their planning toward an escape, which is prudent, don’t forget the Bug In option.  It may become your only option, or indeed the best one available.  For us senior preppers, a Bug In may be the only serious option, but we have to recognize the possibility that we may be forced to leave as well.  But for now, our home is our fort. A Bug In requires additional work on security and lock down measures to withstand a strong storm or an assault threat if it comes to that.  Contingencies have to be in place for water supplies to drink, cook, and for plumbing.  An auxiliary power generator may be needed.  Partnering with neighbors might be an option, too, but all that has to be worked out in advance. Also Read: 10 Tips for Concealed Carry While the thought of failure at anything is not a pleasant idea, without proper planning and initiative to supply, gear up, train and practice, it is a serious factor of reality to consider.  But, it does not have to be.  The secret is to get engaged as soon as possible and keep grinding away at your plan and readiness. Other interesting articles: Survival Cache Podcast Episode 14: Derrick of Prepper Press What Type of Survivalist Are You? 9 Common Medical Emergencies To Prep For 9 Common Spices to Stock (and 5 Uncommon)

Ranking The 10 Best Chainsaws of 2020

Ranking The 10 Best Chainsaws of 2020

The chainsaw has been around for more than a century ( 1 ). In that time it’s become an invaluable tool for landscapers, homeowners, construction companies and of course, the modern lumberjack. They allow for the fast, effective clearing of trees for roadwork, home construction and more. They enable landscapers to prune in a quick, effective manner. They take the toil out of the preparation of firewood and they make the entire timber industry possible. They’re simple in concept, compact in design and affordably priced. And without them storm restoration would be a much more difficult process. Below, we’ve brought together the 10 best chainsaws currently on the market for your consideration. 1. Husqvarna 450 Gas Powered Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price We start our tour of the 10 best chainsaws with this 18 inch gas-powered beauty from Husqvarna. The 450 is small enough to take care of things like firewood and pruning but large enough to clear mid-sized trees with little effort. It’s relatively light at 11.3 pounds but has a powerful 50cc engine that takes no prisoners. When all that power is channeled through the 18 inch guide bar not much is going to stop it. There’s a ton of torque, but because of the LowVib dampening system, very little vibration ( 2 ). The 450 features a low emissions engine, integrated chain brake and built in chain catcher to prevent injury in the event of a broken or derailed chain. Comes with a standard 2 year warranty that can be extended to 4 years. 2. Makita XCU03PT1 Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price Makita understands that battery powered chainsaws come with a built in disadvantage: when the battery dies your chainsaw is useless. So they take the approach that “more is better”. And in this case they’re exactly right. While this is sometimes referred to as a “kit” it’s actually just the company’s excellent XCU03PT1 Chainsaw and 4 – yup, 4 – lithium-ion batteries, each of which takes about 45 minutes to recharge from empty. That means that, as long as you’re working somewhere with power outlets, you’ll never have to worry about running out of battery power. The saw itself has a 14 inch guide bar which makes it a nice tool for landscapers and homeowners. It’s also light and provides power equivalent to a 32cc gas engine. Not bad for a battery job. 3. Husqvarna 460 24-Inch Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The Husqvarna 460 is the big brother of the company’s outstanding 450 that we looked at above. It features a 24 inch guide bar and a slightly larger 60cc gas powered motor to handle both the increased chain weight and whatever it is you’re cutting with this beast. In addition, there’s a centrifugal air cleaning system that keeps big pieces of debris away from the air filter. And you get 3 chains with your purchase. The 460 boasts outstanding torque ( 3 ) at every speed. It’s beautifully balanced to reduce wear and tear on your arms and shoulders. And while it’s a bit heavier than the 450 it’s also an alpha dog that isn’t backing down from the toughest job. 4. Poulan Pro PP4218A Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The Poulan Pro PP4218A is a lightweight but aggressive chainsaw that’s easy on you and tough on wood. It features a 42cc 2-cycle gas engine, an 18 inch guide bar and a quick start system that takes much of the drudgery out of working with a gas engine saw. It also features what the company calls their “Super Clean Air Filtration” system that reduces much of the noxious debris that typically emanates from a gas saw. And it comes with an extra chain, gloves and a nifty carrying case. Landscapers with lots of wooded properties on their circuit will love this saw. It’s nimble enough for pruning and serious enough for all but the biggest trees. The 2 year warranty is a nice layer of icing on the cake. 5. Makita XCU02Z Cordless Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price If you’re looking for a tough but compact and convenient chain saw to handle the occasional job on your wooded lot, here it is. Landscaping companies are going to want to have one of these on hand as well for quick pruning jobs. And if you have a wood burning stove it will save you from long sessions at the chopping block. The guide bar here is a modest 12 inches, which is actually perfect for light projects. It’s also a good size for people with little or no experience with a chain saw. The fact that it only produces 89 decibels makes it very neighbor-friendly. While the auto oiler and integrated chain brake make it both low maintenance and safe to operate. 6. WORX WG304.1 Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The Worx WG304.1 is an outstanding value for those who might need a chainsaw for occasional light duty. This is a corded chainsaw which means you’ll be limited in as far as where you can use it. But if you just need something for around the yard or for firewood prep it’s a solid choice. The 18 inch guide bar means it’s big enough for small trees, pruning and the aforementioned firewood. And the fact that it’s a fairly svelte 11 pounds means it’s not going to destroy your forearms to work with it over the course of an afternoon. The WG304.1 features built in chain brake, automatic oil lubrication and a patented auto-tensioning system that takes the guesswork out of chain adjustments. It’s ready to use right out of the box and there’s a 3 year warranty just for good measure. 7. Remington RM1425 Limb N’ Trim Corded Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The name really says it all with this chainsaw. It’s perfect for light projects around the property including pruning limbs and trimming back those shade tree branches. It weighs a very forearm-friendly 6.25 pounds, has a 14 inch chain and starts up dependably with the push of a button. There’s auto-lube, an auto-tensioner and an 8 amp motor that won’t bring down old growth forest but is ideal for the aforementioned trimming projects. You can even take care of your firewood prep. Although you’ll need to make sure you have a backup battery at the ready. Light, affordable and easy to use it’s ideal for the homeowner who likes to work in the yard. 8. Makita UC4051A 16″ Electric Chain Saw Click Here for the Lowest Price The UC4051A from Makita is a step up from the "Limb N’ Trim" . Which makes it a good choice for landscapers or homeowners who need to cut lots of firewood. Or who have lots of trees within spitting distance of the house. The 16 inch guide bar lets it take on medium sized trees and because it’s beautifully balanced it’s not going to turn your arms to jelly after 20 minutes. The 14.5 amp motor gets the chain spinning at an impressive 2900 FPM. While the integrated limiter prevents the user from burning the motor out. There’s auto-oiling, comfortable grips, built-in chain brake for added safety and tool-less chain adjustment. If you live in the country you should have one. 9. ECHO CCS-58VBT Cordless Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The Echo CCS-58VBT Cordless Chainsaw will accept a 16, 18 or 20 inch guide bar. That makes it one of the most versatile mid-level chainsaws out there. It’s also one of the lightest for its size, weighing in at a very modest 11.2 pounds. And it’s feature rich with its side access tensioner, automatic oiler, highly effective exhaust system and integrated chain break. It does a great job speeding up firewood prep and landscapers will find themselves reaching for it again and again. The CCS-58VBT also boasts an effective vibration reduction system that saves your arms and extends the life of the saw in the process. And let’s not forget the industry best 5-year warranty. 10. Black+Decker LCS 1240 Cordless Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The last item on our list of best chainsaws comes to us from Black+Decker. Their LCS 1240 sports a modest 12 inch guide bar and a 40 volt lithium-ion battery that’s good for 50 minutes or 60 cuts, whichever comes first. It’s really light at just 8.3 pounds and it feels even lighter because it’s so well-balanced. There’s auto-oiling, tool-less tensioning and a wrap around handle that’s extremely comfortable and makes handling a breeze. With its modest price and dependable performance it’s a value winner. FAQs Corded, Gas Powered or Battery Powered? When it comes to chainsaws you have 3 power options: gas-powered, corded and battery powered. Each has their advantages and disadvantages and which one you choose will depend largely on the circumstances of their use. That is, what you intend to cut, how much of it there is to cut and where the cutting will likely happen. Let’s take a closer look at the 3 power options now. Gas – Gas powered chainsaws may require a bit of effort to start but once they’re powered up there isn’t much they can’t cut. They’re typically more powerful than electric powered chainsaws and, as long as you have enough gas with you, they’ll go wherever the wood is. In most cases you should get around an hour of continuous operation on a tank of gas. Sometimes more, sometimes a little less. But the term “gas-powered” is a bit deceptive, since they actually run on a gas/oil mixture ( 4 ) you either have to buy or prepare yourself. Gas-Powered Pros No limit to their portability Still the most powerful option Only limit is the amount of gas you have with you Gas-Powered Cons They pump out a lot of exhaust If you run out of the gas/oil mix you’re out of luck Starting them can be a chore Corded – A corded chainsaw runs on electricity supplied by a power cord. That obviously implies that if you don’t have an outlet handy you’re out of luck. Guys harvesting trees don’t typically have the luxury of having an outlet nearby. So for them, the corded chainsaw is typically a non-starter. Nonetheless, there are still plenty of reasons someone may want a corded chainsaw. For instance, landscape companies almost always have one on hand. And people whose homes are on wooded lots will also likely find plenty of use for a corded chainsaw. Corded Pros No noxious exhaust to deal with They’re typically much quieter than gas powered models They also typically require less maintenance No batteries to die or gas mixtures to buy Corded Cons Not much use to commercial loggers They don’t have the power of a gas model You can’t use just any extension cord ( 5 ) Battery-Powered – The battery powered chainsaw garnered plenty of snickers when it first hit the market. But few people are laughing today. Both available power and battery life have been greatly increased in recent years making them a viable alternative to corded chainsaws in some cases. Although they still aren’t powerful enough to appeal to hard-core loggers. For the most part they’re a nice tool for the homeowner or the landscaper to have on hand for occasional use. Battery-Powered Pros Extremely portable Typically the lightest type of chainsaw Start in an instant and very quiet Battery-Powered Cons The weakest of the 3 power options Batteries tend to run down pretty quick You have to remember to always have a spare battery charged and ready When it comes to power options the choice you make will be driven in large part by how you plan to use the chainsaw. If you envision cutting large trunks in remote locations it’s gas power all the way. If you run a landscaping company, use the chainsaw regularly but have ready access to power outlets on your clients’ homes then corded is a good choice. If you want it just to clear brush in the yard and maybe do some pruning now and then a battery powered chainsaw should fit the bill. How Long Should the Guide Bar Be? A chainsaw isn’t much without a guide bar. And the length of the guide bar is one of the most important considerations when selecting a chainsaw. As a general rule the longer the guide bar the more power you’ll want from your motor. Simply because longer chains are heavier. The length of the guide bar will be driven by the intended use of the chain saw. If it’s too short you may find yourself unable to perform your duties. If it’s too long it can be a safety hazard when cutting small objects. Guide bars tend to vary in length from about 8 inches to as much as 30 inches. (Some guide bars commercial loggers use can be longer than that.) The super short guide bars are used almost exclusively for light work such as pruning. Most guide bars however, tend to be in the 16 to 24 inch range. Here are some things that should help you choose the right length. 16 to 20 Inch Guide Bars – 16 to 20 inch guide bars are considered mid-level. They’ll cut plenty of wood as long as it’s not too thick. This size guide bar is considered the outer limits of what’s practical for pruning and small scale work. But they’re fine for cutting firewood and storm cleanup. If you have little or no experience with a chainsaw this size may be a bit much to learn on. We’d recommend starting smaller and working your way up. 16 to 20 Inch Pros Can handle bigger jobs with relative ease No problem cutting down mid-size trees Good for cutting firewood 16 to 20 Inch Cons May be too big for beginners Too big for finesse work Requires a bigger motor and more power 20 to 24 "Inch Guide Bars" Once you get past 20 inches you’re talking about the kind of lengths professionals rely on. A 24 inch chainsaw can cut 95% of the trees on planet earth and do so without breaking too much of a sweat. And for the record, you’re also talking gas chainsaws with lots of power that can make use of that long chain. That said, few are the situations where a homeowner – or even a landscaper for that matter – will need anything longer than a 20 inch guide bar. 20 to 24 Inch Pros The ability to take down any size tree in your path Saves your forearms a lot of work Enables you to keep moving 20 to 24 Inch Cons Too big for around the house Dangerous for inexperienced users Adds a lot of weight to the chainsaw As we mentioned earlier you can find 30 inch or even bigger guide bars. But anything that large is really a specialty item and not intended for everyday use. What Safety Features are Available? Chainsaws are extremely dangerous tools that can yield deadly consequences if not handled properly. Chainsaw manufacturers are not blind to the risks involved and have worked diligently to make these tools as safe as can be. That includes integrating certain safety features, including: The Chain Brake – The chain brake is an incredibly important safety feature designed to bring the rotating chain to a quick stop should it be necessary. There are typically two ways the chain brake is activated. The first is by pushing the top handle forward should you feel the need to stop the chain for whatever reason. In such cases the chain will usually come to a complete stop in less than a second. The other way the chain brake is engaged is during a kickback event ( 6 ). This type of emergency braking is crucial in order to stave off serious injury should the operator’s hand become dislodged during a violent kickback. The Chain Catcher – When a chain breaks there is always the risk it may fly back toward the operator. To prevent this from happening most saws offer a chain catcher that stops the chain from flying away in the event it breaks or becomes derailed. The process can be loud and jarring but it’s also effective at preventing serious injury. The Safety Throttle – The safety throttle is designed to prevent the chain from being accidentally activated should something hit the trigger. It usually takes the form of a second trigger located on the chainsaw’s rear handle. This dual trigger design might seem like overkill, but if you’re operating in heavy underbrush it could save your bacon. It could also save the life of an unsuspecting family member who accidentally contacts the trigger for whatever reason. We recommend reading the OSHA guide to chainsaw safety ( 7 ) if you’ve never used a chainsaw before. What are the Warning Signs of a Dull Chain? Even the sharpest, highest-quality chainsaw chain will become dull over time. Here are some warning signs that the chain needs sharpening or replacing ( 8 ): You need to physically push the saw into the wood when making a cut. With a sharp chain you would feel the saw being pulled into the wood. The chain pulls to one side creating a crooked cut. This is normally a sign that the teeth on one side of the chain have become dull. The cutting action is not smooth. Instead the saw rattles and shakes as it cuts through the wood. You see smoke coming from the cut even though the saw should be handling it with ease. The Bottom Line The best chain saws are incredible tools that make short work of difficult jobs. But they’re not toys and not all are created equal. You should never purchase a chainsaw based solely on price. Instead you should weigh the reasons you need it, how you plan to use it and how frequently you think you’ll be using it. You should also consider which type of power is right for your purposes. And don’t forget to make sure your chainsaw comes with some basic safety features. If you can get an inexpensive chainsaw that meets all your criteria, great. But don’t buy one simply because it’s cheap.

All About Shipping Guns

All About Shipping Guns

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d1cc9ed2_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d1cc9ed2_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Before attempting to ship a gun to a buyer or a gunsmith for repair, it pays to brush up on the laws and policies in use by the major shipping companies. Photo courtesy Rock Island Auctions – rockislandauction.com My editors have been hearing from some readers who are running into trouble when attempting to ship a firearm they sold through GDTM. These are non-licensed individuals who might be shipping only a gun or two, not dealers. Seems they are being refused service or given incorrect information when attempting to ship through the US Post Office, or a common carrier such as UPS or Fed Ex. Since I ship several firearms every week, I was asked to provide some information on the legal ways to ship firearms. What follows is not legal advice and is provided as information only. If you are going to ship any firearms, I urge you to verify this information at the sources. The first things a gun shipper needs to know are the Federal rules regarding the inter-state shipment of firearms. Rather than cut and paste a bunch of legalese from a BATFE website, I will attempt to give a basic outline. The government regulations state that only an FFL (Federal Firearms License) holder may receive firearms in inter-state shipment. This is when shipping a firearm from one state to another. If a firearm is being shipped within a single state, or intra-state, the rules are a bit different. Shipping a firearm within a state does not require the involvement of an FFL holder, unless there are state regulations governing private sales of firearms. The sender does not need to have an FFL to ship a firearm to an FFL holder. However, some FFLs refuse to receive a firearm from a non-FFL shipper. That is their own policy, not backed up by the regulations. It is suggested that a non-FFL shipping a firearm to an FFL holder include a copy of their ID or drivers license. The receiving FFL must have this information to enter the firearm in their records. I have had transfer firearms show up with nothing to indicate who sent it beyond a return address on the box. If an unlicensed person is shipping a firearm they need to verify that the person or business they are shipping to has a valid FFL. This can be done by getting a signed copy of the recipient FFL mailed or faxed to the sender. Be aware that you might run across a dealer who refuses to provide a copy of their FFL if they are receiving the firearm from a non-licensee. Not a problem if they will give their license number to check on the BATFE website at a page called FFL EZ check. This is the best way to verify that an FFL is current, whether you have a mailed copy or just an FFL number. Try www.atfonline.gov/fflezcheck/ Just type in the FFL numbers and it will display the shipping address and date the license expires. The EZ check site does not work to verify Curio and Relic type 03 licenses. The C&R information is not considered public, while regular dealer FFLs are. You must get a signed copy mailed to you from any C&R FFL holder. Other Federal requirements are that the package containing a firearm NOT contain any markings indicating the contents and that the package require an adult signature at time of delivery. There is no Federal requirement that the shipper be notified that the package contains a firearm if it is being sent to an FFL. Related GunDigest Articles Traditions Firearms Now Shipping Crackshot Rifles Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles Photo Gallery: 14 Amazing Engraved Guns of Gun Digest 2015 Muzzle loading firearms and antique firearms made before Jan. 1, 1899, are exempt from Federal regulation. They can be shipped freely, unless in violation of state law. Now we see that it is legal under Federal law for an un-licensed individual to ship a firearm to an FFL address. The problems come up when uninformed clerks refuse to accept the firearm presented for shipment. Or they add their own rules to make it impossible to comply. This can happen at any shipping venue. Most of the time it is due to ignorance of their own rules and fear of firearms. The only thing one can do is ask to speak to the clerks’ supervisor. Ask to see the relevant regulations in the shipping rules, or tariff. Having your own copy of these rules and the recipients’ FFL copy can sometimes help. Just remember, even though you know you are in compliance with the regulations, you can not force a reluctant shipper to accept any package. United States Postal Service (USPS) Non-licensed individuals can ship rifles or shotguns to any FFL location. Just be sure there is no ammunition included in the package. It is against USPS regulations to mail ANY ammunition at any time. The postal clerk will ask if there is anything liquid, fragile or hazardous in the package. As long as there is no ammunition in the box, you can answer no to this question. An unloaded long gun poses no threat to any freight handlers or truck drivers. Handguns can only be sent by an FFL holder to an FFL holder. A postal form PS 1508 is filed with each handgun shipment where the sender certifies that they and the recipient are FFL licensed dealers, manufacturers or importers. Because the wording on the PS-1508 does not specifically mention C&R it has been assumed that USPS does not recognize a C&R FFL for the purpose of mailing handguns. In fact, the term curio & relic or C&R never appears in any official USPS document. I think it was omitted because they were hardly ever used when the PS-1508 system was devised. It might be nice if someone could get an official opinion on this. Many postmasters have never dealt with firearms shipments. My local USPS folks have actually called me when a customer came in asking questions about gun shipping. A violation of Postal service rules concerning firearms could be considered a Federal crime with all the nasty results that can involve. My USPS notes: USPS would be my first choice for a non-licensee to ship a long gun. Shipping a firearm with insurance will require the receiver to sign for it when delivered. This satisfies the signature requirement. However, I recommend also adding the return receipt card. This post card is signed by the recipient and then mailed back to the shipper. If you need to ship a handgun it might be a good idea to ask a local FFL holder to ship it for you. Even with paying an FFL for his time to ship, USPS will cost less than UPS or Fed Ex which require handguns be sent next day air. Some dealers will do this. Some will not. Laws and shipping company policies regarding handguns and ammunition often differ from shotguns and rifles. Never assume yesterday's policy remains the same today – always check. United Parcel Service (UPS) The following is taken directly from the UPS web site: Special Procedures for Shipping Firearms Firearms will be transported only between licensed importers, licensed manufacturers, licensed dealers, and licensed collectors, as defined in the United States Gun Control Act of 1968, law enforcement agencies of the United States or of any department or agency thereof and law enforcement agencies of any state or department agency, or political subdivision thereof, and between persons not otherwise prohibited from shipping firearms by federal, state or local law and when such shipment complies with all applicable federal, state and local laws.

The New HK433 and the German Army Rifle Competition, Part II

by Hognose In our previous report on the new HK433 military rifle we only included a partial translation of HK’s press release. We stopped because our post was quite long enough, but in the comments many of you asked questions about the items that were not included. So let’s translate some more HK! To begin with, we’ve got some marketbrag that we left off last time: Countless ideas, decades of know-how and mature solutions, tested in the toughest worldwide practice, form the foundation of the trailblazing weapons technologies of Heckler & Koch. In that, the German proportion of value added has remained 100%,since the founding of the traditional enterprise in the Swabian city of Oberndorf in 1949. High-Tech Made in Germany! Joining with the rifle families G36, HK416 and HK417, combat-proven worldwide, the HK433 is now a fourth scalable assault rifle family in the product portfolio of the enterprise. With this entirely novel development, Heckler & Koch underlines anew its claim to built the best assault rifles in the world. With France (HK416AIF), Germany (G36), USA (US Marine Corps M27/HK416), Great Britain (SA80), Norway (HK416), Spain (G36) und Lithuania (G36) Heckler & Koch already provides the standard assault rifle to a comprehensive number of armies and service branches of NATO. Numerous Special Operations Forces of the western world — including for example the US Special Forces, the Kommando Spezialkräfte of the Bundeswehr (KSK) and civil authorities’ special elements (incl. GSG9) – rely on assault rifles from Oberndorf. After that, our translation Friday picks up the ball. Until this point: The Slim Line Handguard developed by Heckler & Koch is firmly attached to the upper receiver, with no play. It can be removed without tools and offers sling attachment points, modular HKey interfaces at 3 and 9 o’clock, as well as a full-length Picatinny rail to MIL-STD-1913 at 6 o’clock. The interchangeable lower receiver defines the desired operating system and thereby reduces the training demands on the operator. Depending on prior firearms training, the operator can select the G36 or the HK416/AR-15 operating system. All control elements are bilaterally available, symmetrically ordered and can be configured as the customer desires. “Drop-in” solutions for the lower receiver expand the functional envelope of the weapon with individually configurable match triggers or trigger-group assemblies. The magazine well in compliance with NATO STANAG 4179 (Draft) provides for secure interoperability with the G36 weapons system, the HK416 or the market-standard AR-15. The grip interface is based on the HK416 weapons family. Through grips with interchangeable grip surfaces and grip backstraps analogous to those of the P30 and SFP/VP pistol series, the rifle can be optimally fitted to various hand sizes. The ergonomically folding and length-adjustable shoulder stock with the height-adjustable cheekpiece mates with the receiver without any play. The length adjustment offers five detents and is dynamically adjustable for this and the personal combat equipment of the operator. Straight, convex and concave buttplates ensure the necessary comfort with the weapon at the ready position. The shoulder stock can be folded to the right at any length adjustment. Here the most extremely compact transport measurements are achieved. The trigger remains freely accessible. The ejection port is not covered, to ensure that in an emergency a functional capability is available even in “transport condition.” H&K weapons are distinguished, along with the highest reliability, also by a standard-setting safety standard. So on the HK433 firing readiness, drop safety (NATO AC225/D14), the ability to safe the weapon in all loading conditions and a high cook-off safety are understood, along with a robust and non-delicate manner of construction, even in dirty, extreme cold and war temperature conditions, or lacking lubricants. Camouflage colors and infrared-absorbing finishes are available, if desired by customers. Special material combinations and surface treatments round out the whole concept of the HK433. They provide for a low-maintenance system under extreme conditions, with an above-average service life. The empty weight of the HK433 with the 16.5″ long barrel is 3.5 kg. Here’s the original .pdf in The Awful German Language: 20170203_Pressemitteilung_-HK433.pdf Now you’re caught up on what HK has said. Tomorrow, assuming of course that the system continues working, we’ll have an update on who’s expected to be playing in the German rifle competition. HK, as the largest German firm participating and the only one offering a 100% German-designed, German-produced weapon from a factory ready to deliver immediately, is thought to have the inside track. Photo courtesy of HK This post first appeared on weaponsman.com

[Review] CVA Cascade: Sub $500 Hunting Bolt Rifle?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s In the last few years there seems to have been a revolution of outstanding budget price bolt actions–so can one more make a splash? If that one more is the CVA Cascade then my answer is a surprised “Yes, it can”. CVA Cascade in 6.5 Creedmoor with a SWFA SS Ultralight and a FLARE Mini mood ring. A beer budget rifle that shoots way outside of its price range, I have been impressed with the Cascade on almost every level. Options, features, accuracy, function–I got a lot more to say though so let’s get to it! Table of Contents Loading... Wait, Isn’t CVA A Muzzleloader Brand? Most of us when we see or hear the name “CVA” we think of their in-line muzzleloaders. If you’re not familiar… well now you are, they make some of the best black powder muzzleloaders and single-shot centerfire rifles on the market. Black powder, you know like the old days But the Cascade is their first centerfire bolt action rifle, and it looks like they knocked one out of the park on the first swing. Granted, they have about 50 years of firearms manufacturing experience to draw on. Enter The Cascade At SHOT 2019 CVA announced they were entering the centerfire bolt-action market with their Cascade line that they now offer in a wide range of calibers. The one they sent for testing is in 6.5 Creedmoor. Their goal was simple: to make the best sub-$600 hunting rifles on the market. Period. CVA Cascade 499 at Sportsmans Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 499 at Sportsmans Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing But that’s a saturated market… They were nice enough to send us one for review and here we are. Stats, Specs, First Impressions Looking at a spec sheet is normally kind of boring, but when you get to read the list of features the Cascade comes with, it does leave you feeling like you’re getting your money’s worth at least. Coming in at under 7 pounds every Cascade comes standard with a 70 degree tri-lug bolt, a threaded muzzle, flush magazine, adjustable length of pull, dual swivel studs, a lifetime warranty, and an MOA guarantee. (Left to Right) CVA Cascade, Tikka T3x, and Bergara B-14 HMR Bolts Something they don’t tell about is the freaking amazing trigger these come with! It’s a little heavy at about 3.5 pounds, but it is the absolute most crisp trigger I’ve ever had on a factory hunting rifle. Zero take up, zero creep, just a clean sharp break. Range Report With all of the ranges closed due to COVID, I packed a few gallons of water and took a trip out to the hell desert wasteland of California. Paired with an SWFA SS 2.5-10x Ultralight scope, from start to finish I’ve been really impressed with the Cascade. It’s lightweight, great trigger, and the “soft touch” finish on the stock is really nice. CVA Cascade and SWFA Ultralight in the hell desert It even does well at not heating up under the suddenly summer sun. First rounds out of the rifle were a little all over the place, after about 20 rounds of Hornady American Gunner 140gr ammo the Cascade was shooting a not great 2.1 MOA. CVA 2.1 MOA group, "American Gunner 140gr" ammo, 100 yards This continued for another 50 rounds or so until it finally settled down to a more respectable 1.4 MOA. CVA Cascade 1.4 MOA, American Gunner 140gr, 100 yards Not the best grouping, but more than enough for game shooting. Something I did find was that while being very lightweight is awesome for hiking with, it makes for a rough day at the range. Thankfully, a threaded barrel means you can throw a good brake on this rifle and plink all day. Something I really liked was that it uses a tri-lug design bolt with a 70-degree throw. Having the extra clearance between my hand and the scope was really nice, something I’ve gotten used to after shooting Tikka rifles. In total, I put about 100 rounds through the Cascade, not a huge round count but more than enough to get to know a hunting rifle. And something I found was that it needs to break-in… Break-In Period Break-in periods are misunderstood in the firearms community, I think. But what can’t be argued is that the Cascade really did benefit from just being ran and shot for a while. Two major things happened around the 50 round mark, one the groups tightened up a lot and two the bolt started to feel much smoother. Due to the Cerakoting, it felt like the bolt was sticking a bit when cycling. After being worked back and forth for a while it seemed to work though that issue and started to run smooth. I wouldn’t call it butter-smooth like a Tikka, but it didn’t bind and didn’t take a lot of effort to run–so that was good enough. One interesting thing about the bolt is that it is HUGE. (left to right) CVA Cascade, Bergara B-14 HMR, Tikka T3x bolts — All in 6.5 Creedmoor The Cascade is offered in a wide range of calibers and I suspect that CVA uses the same bolt body for almost all of them. If you look closely you can see that the Cascade’s bolt body is nearly the same OD as the bolt lugs. Compare that to the Bergara or Tikka bolts with a significantly smaller OD. This doesn’t really mean anything, I assume CVA does this as a cost-saving measure and since it doesn’t impact the function of the rifle–it’s a good move. It’s just interesting to see. Is That A… Mood Ring? No, it isn’t. Well, kind of. Okay, it is. Flare Mini on the CVA Cascade It’s really a Flare Mini that the guys at Caveman sent me to play with. The Cascade was the fist of several rifles I’ve put them on and… I like it. The Flare Mini is a polymer ring that fits over your barrel and changes color when heated. In this case going from a muted OD green to a bright neon green when over 131 degrees. Why would you want a mood ring on your rifle? First, it lets you know when the barrel is too hot to touch. Also when it’s cool enough to go back in a case so it won’t melt anything. Personally, I didn’t think I would find much use for it on the Cascade. But it turns out that I did find it handy. Since this is a hunting rifle with a fairly lightweight sporter profile barrel, the barrel does heat quickly. With the Flare Mini on it, I had an easy way of seeing when the barrel was hot and I needed to give it a break before more shooting or risk losing precision due to a hot barrel. Flare Mini 12 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Issues? Nope. ***UPDATE*** CVA reached out after publication and informed me that what I thought was a QC miss is probably incorrect. The rifle shipped to me had been test-fired before leaving the factory and that included mounting a scope. This likely caused the wear or thinning of the Cerakote that I took to be a QC miss. Due to this, the incorrect information has been removed — but the picture remains so that readers can see what it is we’re talking about. The explanation does make sense since it is in the exact place I would expect this to occur. Considering how very well made the rest of the rifle is, I find it much more likely that this was a test-fire wear mark instead of a QC miss. CVA Cerakote worn Things I Love The QC issue really had me worried about what else I would find once I got to shooting the Cascade, but I’m happy to report that it was the only problem I had. Everything else is outstanding. Even the little details like the thread protector being metal instead of this cheapass plastic that most brands are using, this actually matters! CVA Cascade METAL thread protector The trigger is perfect, the stock feels great, the bolt is smooth once it’s broken in. The magazine is also really nice to see. This is good, solid, thick plastic. It feels strong, it locks well in the rifle, and loading is easy. Another area that we’re seeing some brands skimp on is the mags, but CVA did it right and produced something of quality. CVA Cascade magazine And last but maybe the best part is that it is LIGHT. With the SWFA scope the whole package came in at only 7.5 pounds. Perfect mountain weight! By The Numbers Reliability: 5/5 It’s a bolt action, so that’s hard to mess up. But it ran perfectly. Zero issues of any kind and the magazine was very solid. I would absolutely expect this rifle to do just fine long term. Ergonomics: 4/5 I really like the soft-touch stock, it’s… well, soft. It feels great in your hand and on your cheek and is really grippy without being annoying. I would like to have some knurling or texture to the bolt handle, but some grip tape will solve that. That might be just me though since my long range rifles have very aggressive bolt knobs. Checkering in the “soft touch” stock made for a great gripping surface that didn’t wear on my hand Accuracy: 4/5 1.4 MOA was a bit larger than I would like, but I shoot 5-round groups minimum and was running factory ammo. That said, this is absolutely accurate enough to ethically hunt with. Customization: 2/5 Since this is CVA’s own design, there doesn’t look like much on the market to fit it. While the Cascade takes Savage 110 scope bases, CVA doesn’t mention if the action itself will fit a Savage or someone else’s inlet for stocks and chassis. But again this is a hunting rifle and I love the stock it came with. It does retain 2 points though since it has a threaded barrel and that opens up a lot of options. Personally, I’m going to throw a muzzle brake on it to help tame the recoil a little since it is so lightweight. And it does come with two front swivel studs so you can mount a bipod and a sling at the same time. Value: 5/5 For the price you’re getting a LOT of rifle. It’s good looking, good feeling, the trigger is amazing, and the details like thread protector and magazine are well executed. Plus, it has a threaded barrel for a ton of options that way. CVA Cascade 499 at Sportsmans Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 499 at Sportsmans Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing Overal l: 4/5 Conclusion The CVA Cascade is a high-value rifle. Punching way outside of its price point, this rifle simply delivers. While the cosmetic QC could have been better, the functional parts are well-engineered and amazingly executed. I highly recommend the Cascade for a true working or hunting rifle. Working in the firearms industry is awesome, the range of firearms I’ve gotten to shoot that I otherwise would have never laid eyes on is one of my favorite parts. Sometimes I get asked to review something that I really don’t have much interest in. If I’m honest, the CVA Cascade was one of those. Another budget-minded hunting rifle is… not high on my list of things to take to the range and spend ammo on. By the end of using the Cascade I’ve changed my mind, this was actually a real treat to get to use. For the price this is an incredible rifle that feels and functions great. The attention to detail is impressive. Good magazines, awesome trigger, short bolt throw, metal thread protector, all of it tells me that this rifle was designed by people that care about their product and that use their product themselves. I would absolutely recommend this rifle to anyone looking for a quality hunting rifle. What is your go-to budget-friendly hunting rifle? What was the best game you’ve taken with it? Let us know in the comments! If you’re just getting started in hunting, take a look at our Introduction to Deer Hunting . If you need some great glass for your new rifle, the Best Long Range Optics can help! Oh yes…we love optics!

Summary

BulletSafe launched into the market in August 2013. Located in Troy, MI, a suburb of Detroit, MI, Tom Nardone, the company president has made sure the company has done a good job at sourcing quality materials and components in the manufacturing and assembly of his vests. Balancing quality with affordability the BulletSafe bulletproof vest – level IIIA is what you get.